Friday, 24 August 2012

NORTH RIVER FALLS
Lower Five Islands, Colchester County
45N26.073 64W04.887
20T E415412 N5031794


RIVER: North River

CLASS:  plunge
SIZE: 60 '
RATING: excellent (****1 /2)

TRAIL: dirt road/trails
DISTANCE: 600m
HIKING TIME: 45 minutes
CONDITIONS: moderate

Geocache: GCV2WX

NS Atlas Page: 37/Z2
NS topo map: 021H08 (Parrsboro)

photo Phil Wilkinson (2007)

DRIVING DIRECTIONS: take HWY102 north to its conclusion as it meets HWY104, and take the left lane west towards Amherst/New Brunswick. Drive 16.4km and take the exit towards Glenholme. Turn right at the end of the exit on HWY4 and drive 1.6km. Turn right onto HWY2 (towards Parrsboro) and drive 6.5km to Great Village, turning right at the fork in the road to remain on HWY2 and continue 41.2km to the village of Five Islands. Turn right onto Little York Rd and drive 2.5km watching for an overgrown road on your left. Park here (WPT: 45N25' 52.1" 64W04'16.3")

photo Jeremie Landry

TRAIL DESCRIPTION: follow the old road down the hill, about 900m. Just after you cross a small wooden bridge, watch for a short trail on your left that leads to the ropes that are in place to assist one down into the ravine at the base of the falls. Remember the caveat about using ropes that you have not personally placed when descending. These ropes are exposed to the elements so use caution.

photo Sylvia Fisher

At sixty feet, these are spectacular falls with a deep plunge pool. Breathtaking in scope, this beautiful plunge is one of the prettiest and most impressive waterfalls on mainland Nova Scotia. Nearby, in Five Islands, a tiny hamlet with a population of 300, you can also spend the day at Five Islands Provincial Park. The park features a 90 site campground that is open from June 15-October 8 for the 2012 season. There are also two picnic parks, a rock beach on the Bay of Fundy dominated by 300 foot cliffs, as well as ongoing hosting activities including clam digging, rock hounding and historic walks. 

photo Tammy Aucoin

view over the precipice
photo Phil Wilkinson